The Generosity Journal

Writing To Reach You

Writing To Reach You

Whaiora Patrick knows all too well the shame and stress of child poverty and how badly it can affect your mental health and wellbeing growing up: she’s been there. There were dark and lonely times but Whaiora survived thanks to her love of writing and desire to help others. A Future Leader with Inspiring Stories, she wants to share her experiences to show young people that it’s okay to not be okay.

Wellington’s Neonatal Angels

Wellington’s Neonatal Angels

Wellington’s NICU cares for more than 1000 of the hospital’s tiniest patients each year, the vast majority of whom will go home with their relieved and proud parents. Behind them are devoted nurses who have worked long hours, employing the latest technology and techniques, caring their best to give these newest of New Zealanders the greatest shot at life.

The Gift Of Hope

The Gift Of Hope

For Ken Te Tau, losing a foot meant gaining a second chance at life, as his amputation opened the way to new opportunities. But Ken also helps others by giving them hope and he now sees himself as someone who weaves people together. Ken offers peer support to fellow amputees in Aotearoa and gives amputees overseas a new life by recycling prostheses for charity Take My Hands. As a cultural adviser he brings Pākehā into the Māori world, as a musician he inspires Pink Floyd fans.

Wendy Preston

Wendy Preston

Wendy Preston has always been a self-starter with the capacity to inspire people and sweep them along with her. Her life of constant creativity, strong role models, and cross-cultural experiences was a natural fit for a project that uses creativity to empower young people with refugee and migrant backgrounds to increase their confidence, self-expression and communication skills.

Pip Findlay

Pip Findlay

Growing up in South Africa gave Pip Findlay a love of nature and the environment. Later, in New Zealand, she learned of rhinos being poached to the verge of extinction and began a fundraising initiative to help. Seeing what a small group of people can accomplish together when they care about a cause now sees her making a difference in the lives of people in Malawi and Myanmar. She also makes a mean banana loaf!

Cover Artist: Kelly Spencer

Cover Artist: Kelly Spencer

The dazzling cover art of The Generosity Journal you’re holding comes courtesy of self-described design fairy, Kelly Spencer. She’s a freelance graphic artist based in Wellington but busy around the world. Kelly’s creative style is characterized by a bold use of colour, curvaceous forms, and clean lines. Here, she talks us through how the cover came together, life as a freelance artist, and what she’s been up to lately.

Lani Evans

Lani Evans

You’d be forgiven for thinking that Lani Evans was New Zealand’s own Superwoman. She heads the Vodafone New Zealand Foundation, co-chairs Thankyou Charitable Trust, chairs Thankyou Payroll and is on the committee for the JR McKenzie Trust’s Peter McKenzie Project. Not to mention being involved in the first all-female traverse of the South Island, proposing to her partner at the end of the 100km Oxfam Trailwalker and fighting the crime of wastefulness through dumpster diving – plus being an amazing 1% donor and Future 50 member. Phew!

James Bushell

James Bushell

Inspired by the possibility of making someone’s life better gets Motif’s Director and One Percent’s Chair, James Bushell, out of bed each day.

A fan of millenials and their conscientious decision-making (go millenials!) and a member of the crew that sailed a vaka unassisted to Bougainville and back searching for sustainable cocoa beans for Wellington Chocolate Factory, James is pretty proud he hasn’t scared his family and friends away, yet.

Julian Moller

Julian Moller

Julian Moller is a self-proclaimed nerd and known here at One Percent as ‘The Wizard’. From Opoho, Dunedin, Julian grew up exploring the ’burbs with his brothers, building huts in the bush and playing touch down at the local park. Nowadays, he works his magic as a programmer and developer at 1000minds, dabbles in a bit of craft beer brewing with his mates (they’ve called themselves 1000Brews – shout out to the Occasional Brewer) and is our much-valued volunteer tech support wiz.

Be Human

Be Human

To be human is to be on a journey – in Samoan, faigamalaga. A journey to discover your own kaupapa, and to find ways to live it out. At DCM, we talk about picking up the paddle – ki te hoe. For me, that’s a journey to becoming and to being my best self. We call the people we work with taumai, meaning ‘to settle’. You could say that to be human is to be on a journey to a place where you are settled, where your wairua (in Samoan, agaga) is settled.